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SS Uganda

Ally

Deckhand
Built by Barclay Curle & Company Glasgow,
Yard No 720
Engines by Wallsend Slipway & Engineering Co Ltd, WallsendLast Name: TRITON
Previous Names: (Karatina)
Port of Registry: London
Propulsion: Six Parsons steam turbines, 12300shp, single reduction geared to twin screws, 16 knots.
Launched: Tuesday, 15 January 1952
Built: 1952
Ship Type: Passenger Liner
Ship's Role: UK/East Africa service, later Educational Cruising
Tonnage: 14430 gross; 8034 net; 9630 dwt
Length: 539ft 9in
Breadth: 71ft 5in
Draught: 27ft 5in
Owner History:
British India Steam Navigation Company London
Status: Arrived for Scrapping - 15/07/1986, Kaohsiung

Remarks:
15/01/1952: Launched by Lady Hall, wife of Sir John Hathorn Hall, retired Governor of Uganda, then a British territory in East Africa. It had originally been intended to name her KARATINA.
16/07/1952: Delivered to the British India Steam Navigation Co Ltd, London, after trials, when she achieved 19.52 knots. She could originally accommodate 167 First Class and 133 Tourist Class passengers.
02/08/1952: Maiden voyage London/Beira.
05/04/1967: Arrived at Hamburg to be converted by Howaldtswerke Hamburg AG, into an educational cruise ship at a cost of £2,800,000. Tonnages now 16,907 gross, 8,827 net; 5,695 tons deadweight; 306 cabin passengers and 920 dormitory berths.
15/02/1968: Redelivered after refit.
27/02/1968: Sailed from Southampton on her first voyage in her new role.
01/10/1971: Management and operation transferred to P&O Passenger Division, but she retained BI livery.
05/12/1972: Ownership transferred to The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, London.
10/04/1982: Requisitioned for service with the Falklands Task Force.
13/04/1982: Discharged her children and passengers at Naples. She proceeded to Gibraltar where she was converted for use as a hospital ship with 136 medical staff.
19/04/1982: Sailed for the South Atlantic. Nicknamed 'Mother Hen', she operated in conjunction with three Royal Navy survey ships converted to ambulance carriers.
12/05/1982: The first casualties, from the destroyer HMS SHEFFIELD, were landed on station in the Falklands by helicopter. During the two
month period UGANDA served as a hospital ship she treated 730 casualties, of whom 150 were Argentine prisoners; and 504 operations were carried out.
13/07/1982: Red crosses painted out and became a troopship.
09/08/1982: Returned to Southampton carrying troops. Extensively refitted by Smith’s Shiprepairers North Shields Ltd, at North Shields.
25/09/1982: Returned to commercial service.
11/1982: Chartered for a further two years as a store ship to operate between Ascension and the Falklands, pending completion of a new airport.
14/01/1983: Sailed for Falklands after new helicopter deck fitted at Southampton.
11~12/1983: Refitted at Falmouth.
25/04/1985: Arrived at Falmouth at the end of her charter.
04/05/1985: Laid up in the River Fal.
11/02/1986: P&O Lines Ltd appointed managers.
29/04/1986: Sold to Triton Shipping Co, St Vincent, and renamed TRITON.
20/05/1986: Sailed from the River Fal.
15/07/1986: Arrived at Kaohsiung for demolition by An Hsiung Iron and Steel Co Ltd. Anchored outside the port subject to possible resale.
22/08/1986: Driven aground by the typhoon 'Wayne'. Reported lying on her side as late as March 1992, she is believed to have been subsequently broken up.
UGANDA_720.jpg
 

Neil

Deckhand
Some photos of the ss Uganda while she was used for school holiday cruises.

They also show her in use as a troop ship and hospital ship at the time of the Falklands war and her rusty condition on her return to the Uk.

She was the only merchant ship in the Falklands area able to have a Chinook helicopter land on her landing pad.
UGANDA 1.jpg
UGANDA 3.jpg
UGANDA 2.jpg
UGANDA 4.jpg
UGANDA 6.jpg
 

aliq

Deckhand
My first cruise was on the SS Uganda in 1974 on a school cruise. We went to Amsterdam, Oporto and La Rochelle. We had a fab time and it was definitely the reason for being hooked on cruising now. :biggrinbounce2:
 

aliq

Deckhand
Hi Middy
We were lucky and probably didn't appreciate it but it was a fantastic opportunity. :roflmao:
 

aliq

Deckhand
Yes, there were classrooms and dormitories and we all slept in bunks. It was just like going to Brownie camp only on a ship. The lessons each day were very light-weight, learning about the ports of call, the ships flags, knots, names of the pieces of equipment. around the ship. There were lots of different schools there and the dormitories were named after explorers - we were in Picard and the boys were in Cousteau. I think that there were about 300 school children aboard. There were about 20 from our school and 2 teachers. Great fun even though I was sea-sick in the Bay of Biscay. Never been sick since, mind you, :roflmao:
 

middy

Deckhand
Sounds like a great experience Aliq.:) So do you remember all the knots and flags?
I got to do a week in the brecon beacons when at school, not quite the same.
 

Neil

Deckhand
In addition to the ' kids' on board, ss Uganda had a lot of her original cabins still in use in the forward part of the ship and carried about 300 passengers.

Some would be fare paying passengers and others connected with the school parties on board or lecturers.

Photo of the ' kids ' going ashore and the smoke room for the adults !

The tusks in the smoke room were presented to the ship in her early days when she operated as a passenger / cargo ship on the East African service.

I had the pleasure of sailing in a holiday leave relief position on a couple of her cruises to the North Cape around 1969 !
ss uganda kids ashore.jpg
ss uganda smoking  room.jpg
 

aliq

Deckhand
You know, I don't remember any adults being on the ship. I felt as though we had the run of the ship. It was great fun. I don't remember any of the flags or knots that we learned but it was a while ago. :laughalot:
 

Neil

Deckhand
That was no doubt due to the ' Kids ' being kept in their cage at the aft end of the ship ! :roflmao: :roflmao:

They were never allowed near the forward passenger accommodation plus the teachers got some peace !
 

aliq

Deckhand
Before I went on the trip my Dad used to tease me saying that all the kids were on board to row the ship to save the engines! :whip:
 

middy

Deckhand
Did it make you think when he was teasing you? Bet he pointed out the portholes as to where the oars came out of :)
 

Neil

Deckhand
Hi Aliq

From my nautical collection !

Picture of one of the BI ' ss Uganda ' baggage labels which has never been used !

Click on picture for larger version !
ss Uganda baggae label.jpg
 

aliq

Deckhand
Fantastic label, very 1970's - much cheerier than the ones you get now. Great find, Neil. :roflmao:
 

Neil

Deckhand
I have had the label since doing a couple of relief cruises on ss Uganda to sort out some problems with some of the staff in the passenger part of the ship.
 
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