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Casual Cooks 101

gottabecruisin

Deckhand
I bought a butterball turkey for dinner tomorrow, it is already stuffed and the instructions indicate you are not to allow to thaw, you are to cook it frozen...

I am really wondering how this is gonna taste....:eek:
 

Chucksta63

Deckhand
We just got our shippment of Ribs from Memphis!!!!
My Mom's friend sends it to us every year!!!
Ribs
Beans
Pulled Pork
Pecan Pie!
Seasonings
 

gottabecruisin

Deckhand
That's cool, looks good.. I loove pulled pork...


I am cooking the usual, turkey, ham, pierogies, meat on a stick, cabbage rolls and 20 lbs of mashed potatoes.
 

gottabecruisin

Deckhand
I bought a butterball turkey for dinner tomorrow, it is already stuffed and the instructions indicate you are not to allow to thaw, you are to cook it frozen...

I am really wondering how this is gonna taste....:eek:

This turkey was AWESOME...... No cleaning the turkey, jsut put it in the pan and intot the oven and out it comes delicious 8 hours later


Let overs for the next week!:eek:
 

alphakitty

Deckhand
Sounds good Lisa...a no fuss turkey :) I made a yummy crown roast. It's really a delicious cut of pork. Tonight I'm going out for burgers, I'm sick of cooking. LOL
 

Chucksta63

Deckhand
TURDUCKEN (A CHICKEN IN A DUCK IN A TURKEY)


The Turducken will need to cook for approximately 9 hours at 225 degrees F so begin preparation well in advance. The fowls can be deboned the day before and kept refrigerated overnight. Save the turkey carcass for making stock and some duck skin to render fat. We sometimes make the sausage stuffing the night before and store it in the refrigerator, but it helps to warm it in the microwave before final assembly. Basic Needs:

  • 16-20 lb whole turkey
  • 4-5 lb whole duckling
  • 3-4 lb whole chicken (or use a larger chicken and place the duckling inside it)
  • corn bread dressing
  • sausage stuffing
  • large roasting pan and rack
  • cotton string
  • large needle and cotton thread
Debone the birds:


Sharpen those knives! Maximize your work area so you have plenty of room and light. Use the kitchen table if there's not enough counter space. If it is your first time deboning a fowl, it is advisable to practice first on the chicken rather than the turkey since mistakes will be hidden inside the bigger birds.
Rinse the turkey and remove the neck and any giblets. Place the turkey, breast side down, on a clean flat surface. Cut through the skin along the length of the spine. Using the tip of a knife and starting from the neck end, gently separate meat from rib cage on one side. Toward neck end, cut through the meat to expose the shoulder blade; cut meat away from and around the bone, severing bone at the joint to remove shoulder blade. Disjoint wing between second and third joints. Leave the wing bones and keep the wing attached to the meat.
Continue separating meat from frame, heading toward the thighbone and being careful to keep the "oyster" (pocket of meat on back) attached to skin, rather than leaving it with the bone. Cut through ball-and-socket joint to release the thighbone from the carcass (bird will be open on one side, exposing bones left to deal with). Keep the leg attached to the meat.
Repeat boning procedure on the other side of the bird. Carefully remove the carcass and use it to make stock. Stock is needed for making stuffing and more stock is needed for gravy. To make stock, put the turkey carcass in a large pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then simmer on low heat overnight.
You should end up with a flat boneless (except for wings and legs) turkey with the skin intact in one large piece. Put the boned turkey in a large dish or bowl and cover with plastic wrap to keep it from drying out. Place it in the refrigerator.
Repeat the deboning process on the duckling and the chicken, but debone both stumps of wings and leg drumsticks. Cut through flesh at the thinnest point and trim around these bones with a knife until they can be removed. (Since they have little meat, we usually cut off the entire wings and add them to the stock pot.) Both the chicken and duck will be stuffed inside the turkey and need not be kept "perfectly" intact.
Trim excess skin and fat from the birds. Ducks, in particular, have a lot of excess fatty skin that should be saved to render fat to be used later for making gravy. We usually completely remove the skin from the chicken, but keep some duck skin which adds flavor. Prepare seasoning mix and set aside:

  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1-2 teaspoons dried thyme
Sausage stuffing:


Melt butter in large skillet over high heat. Add 3 cups onions and 1-1/2 cups celery. Saute until onions are dark brown but not burned, about 10 to 12 minutes. Add 2 lbs sausage (we prefer spicy Italian sausage) to the skillet and cook about 5 minutes or until the meat is browned, stirring frequently. Add paprika (3 tbsp.) and minced garlic (3 tbsp.) and cook approximately 3 minutes over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Stir in 3 cups of stock and bring to simmer. Continue cooking until water evaporates and oil rises to top, about 10 minutes. Stir in 2-3 cups toasted bread crumbs and mix well. Add more bread crumbs if mixture is too moist. Prepare a similar amount of another stuffing such as corn bread stuffing.
turduck2.jpg
 

BarbO1999

Deckhand
No offense Chuck but that sounds gross!!!!

I had a prime rib roast for christmas and it was awful...the worst piece of meat I ever had...had to saw it with the knife.
 

gottabecruisin

Deckhand
No offense Chuck but that sounds gross!!!!

I had a prime rib roast for christmas and it was awful...the worst piece of meat I ever had...had to saw it with the knife.
omg barb what did you do to the meat ? was it the cut, the butcher ?
the time of cooking ?

I usually make mine well done and have never had a prime rib like that...
 

BarbO1999

Deckhand
omg barb what did you do to the meat ? was it the cut, the butcher ?
the time of cooking ?

I usually make mine well done and have never had a prime rib like that...
I have no idea cooked it the same as I always do I blamed the butcher and meat of course.:dancing_banana:
 
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